History

In 1937 Anni and Fritz Kaufmann-Almer, the grandparents of the present owner, built a wooden chalet as their house on Bodmi making the ground floor into what turned into the legendary Bodmi tea room. It was the time when Grindelwald ski school was bringing an ever increasing number of guests to the Bodmi all wanting to learn to ski in this unique area. As is usual in tourist resorts like Grindelwald, these eager skiers also needed some kind of refreshment and for this the tea room was ideal. Whilst Anni Kaufmann tended to the wishes of the mainly British guests her husband Fritz, a farmer, specialised in the care of the entirely wooden, rather labour-intensive skis. Shortly after its successful opening the 2nd World War broke out and the foreign guests stayed away. As a small compensation for the loss of these new earnings family members of those stationed in the military hospital in Grindelwald used to come to Anni for food and drinks. With this modest income and the farming business the two of them managed to keep their heads above water during the long war. We still possess an original price-list from the war where the prices are listed in Swiss francs but also the corresponding value in coupons.
After the war was thankfully over on 8th May 1945 tourism, and above all winter tourism picked up rapidly so that the modest premises soon proved to be too small to meet the growing demand. The two pioneers decided to extend the building to the west to enlarge the restaurant. Their courage to take on risk and pioneering spirit must have been in the genes. Anni Kaufmann’s grandfather, and great-great-grandfather of Elisabeth Kaufmann, was one of the greatest pioneers in climbing. We’re talking about Christian Almer (1826-1898), without exaggeration certainly one of the best and well-known mountain guides of his time. His list of first ascents encompasses about 50 summits including Mönch (1857), Eiger (1858), Grosses Fiescherhorn (1862) around his home; Ecrins (1864), Jorasses-West summit, Aiguille Verte (1865), Ailefroide (1870), Les Bans (1878), all summits in the French Alps.

History

In 1937 Anni and Fritz Kaufmann-Almer, the grandparents of the present owner, built a wooden chalet as their house on Bodmi making the ground floor into what turned into the legendary Bodmi tea room. It was the time when Grindelwald ski school was bringing an ever increasing number of guests to the Bodmi all wanting to learn to ski in this unique area. As is usual in tourist resorts like Grindelwald, these eager skiers also needed some kind of refreshment and for this the tea room was ideal. Whilst Anni Kaufmann tended to the wishes of the mainly British guests her husband Fritz, a farmer, specialised in the care of the entirely wooden, rather labour-intensive skis. Shortly after its successful opening the 2nd World War broke out and the foreign guests stayed away. As a small compensation for the loss of these new earnings family members of those stationed in the military hospital in Grindelwald used to come to Anni for food and drinks. With this modest income and the farming business the two of them managed to keep their heads above water during the long war. We still possess an original price-list from the war where the prices are listed in Swiss francs but also the corresponding value in coupons.
After the war was thankfully over on 8th May 1945 tourism, and above all winter tourism picked up rapidly so that the modest premises soon proved to be too small to meet the growing demand. The two pioneers decided to extend the building to the west to enlarge the restaurant. Their courage to take on risk and pioneering spirit must have been in the genes. Anni Kaufmann’s grandfather, and great-great-grandfather of Elisabeth Kaufmann, was one of the greatest pioneers in climbing. We’re talking about Christian Almer (1826-1898), without exaggeration certainly one of the best and well-known mountain guides of his time. His list of first ascents encompasses about 50 summits including Mönch (1857), Eiger (1858), Grosses Fiescherhorn (1862) around his home; Ecrins (1864), Jorasses-West summit, Aiguille Verte (1865), Ailefroide (1870), Les Bans (1878), all summits in the French Alps.